A collection of truly gorgeous paintings of Native Americans, New World landscapes, and the occasional colonial soldier or Old West pioneer.

Dan Nance displays an in-depth knowledge of many types of terrain, and is especially skilled at depicting different grades of light and weather conditions; we highly recommend his artwork as inspirational material for any Crossroads: The New World campaign.

The Feast of the Hungry Ghosts, or Yu Lan Jie (盂蘭節), or simply “the Ghost Festival”, takes place every year on the 15th day of 7th lunar month; the following lunar month is called the Ghost Month (鬼月). In 2014, the Ghost Month will last from July 27th to August 24th.

During this time, the gates of the Chinese afterlife are flung open, and the souls of the dead return to Earth to check up on their descendants, who honor them with prayers and shrines, offerings of food and drink, and the burning of incense. Neglected and lost ghosts envy their more fortunate peers, and wander the land in search of living souls to torment.

nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

Native American symbols offer us a complete and reverent language of life, nature, and spirit. This language is unmatched in its depth and power. http://bit.ly/1npqlVe 

Cahokian (commonly known as “Tradespeak”) is the lingua franca of all Great Plains traders, and many who deal with Cahokia’s client-tribes even in passing find it extremely useful to learn the Cahokian tongue.The written form of the language, known as the “Cahokian Syllabary”, is not a fully-developed writing system, but mainly a method of notation for trade and taxes (similar to the early stages of cuneiform). Shown above are a tiny selection of some common glyphs which are used to express ideas in written Cahokian.

nativeamericannews:

Native American symbols offer us a complete and reverent language of life, nature, and spirit. This language is unmatched in its depth and power. http://bit.ly/1npqlVe 

Cahokian (commonly known as “Tradespeak”) is the lingua franca of all Great Plains traders, and many who deal with Cahokia’s client-tribes even in passing find it extremely useful to learn the Cahokian tongue.

The written form of the language, known as the “Cahokian Syllabary”, is not a fully-developed writing system, but mainly a method of notation for trade and taxes (similar to the early stages of cuneiform).

Shown above are a tiny selection of some common glyphs which are used to express ideas in written Cahokian.

nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

Joe & Angie Reano are full blooded Native jewelers. They are blessed with a natural talent to continue the long lived tradition of hand making jewelry from their ancestors. http://bit.ly/1rkfcEm

Turquoise is one of the most-coveted precious stones in North Vespuccia; it is used extensively in jewelry, but also ceremonial masks, weapons, ear-gauges, nose- and lip-plugs, and as sacrificial offerings to many deities. The stone has especial spiritual significance to the Aztecs and various Pueblo peoples.

nativeamericannews:

Joe & Angie Reano are full blooded Native jewelers. They are blessed with a natural talent to continue the long lived tradition of hand making jewelry from their ancestors. http://bit.ly/1rkfcEm

Turquoise is one of the most-coveted precious stones in North Vespuccia; it is used extensively in jewelry, but also ceremonial masks, weapons, ear-gauges, nose- and lip-plugs, and as sacrificial offerings to many deities. The stone has especial spiritual significance to the Aztecs and various Pueblo peoples.

Quetzalcoatl (Nahuatl for “beautiful/feathered serpent”), called Kukulcan by the Maya, is the god of learning, writing, the wind, the sun, and the morning-star or evening-star (i.e., the planet Venus). He is also the patron of priests and craftsmen, and the inventor of the Aztec calendar. He was one of the principal gods of both Mayan and Aztec pantheons, but unlike most Mesoamerican deities, he rarely received sacrifices of human lives (except during times when the sun eclipsed the planet Venus, to ensure his successful rebirth).
Quetzalcoatl is usually depicted as a many-fanged serpent with a ruff of feathers around his neck, but he is sometimes depicted as a man with a beard, or as a man with two tubes protruding from his mouth, which are the source of all winds.

Quetzalcoatl (Nahuatl for “beautiful/feathered serpent”), called Kukulcan by the Maya, is the god of learning, writing, the wind, the sun, and the morning-star or evening-star (i.e., the planet Venus). He is also the patron of priests and craftsmen, and the inventor of the Aztec calendar. He was one of the principal gods of both Mayan and Aztec pantheons, but unlike most Mesoamerican deities, he rarely received sacrifices of human lives (except during times when the sun eclipsed the planet Venus, to ensure his successful rebirth).

Quetzalcoatl is usually depicted as a many-fanged serpent with a ruff of feathers around his neck, but he is sometimes depicted as a man with a beard, or as a man with two tubes protruding from his mouth, which are the source of all winds.